The Monstromologist: Rick Yancey

Now this was an… er…. interesting book!

It was written as a diary or a memoir of sorts and it goes through a story of when the “author” was a boy and an apprentice to a Scientist of Monsters.

It’s a YA book, but it’s quite gorey and so I would think it was a little mature for the average YA reader, but what do I know?

I really liked it though!

and recommend it to those who don’t mind reading a lot about blood and guts and gore.

Amazon Summary:
With a roaring sense of adventure and enough viscera to gag the hardiest of gore hounds, Yancey’s series starter might just be the best horror novel of the year. Will Henry is the 12-year-old apprentice to Pellinore Warthrop, a brilliant and self-absorbed monstrumologist–a scientist who studies (and when necessary, kills) monsters in late-1800s New England. The newest threat is the Anthropophagi, a pack of headless, shark-toothed bipeds, one of whom’s corpse is delivered to Warthrop’s lab courtesy of a grave robber. As the action moves from the dissecting table to the cemetery to an asylum to underground catacombs, Yancey keeps the shocks frequent and shrouded in a splattery miasma of blood, bone, pus, and maggots. The industrial-era setting is populated with leering, Dickensian characters, most notably the loathsome monster hunter hired by Warthrop to enact the highly effective “Maori Protocol” method of slaughter. Yancey’s prose is stentorian and wordy, but it weaves a world that possesses a Lovecraftian logic and hints at its own deeply satisfying mythos. Most effective of all, however, is the weirdly tender relationship between the quiet, respectful boy and his strict, Darwinesque father figure. “Snap to!” is Warthrop’s continued demand of Will, but readers will need no such needling

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing; 1 Reprint edition (July 20, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416984496
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